Educational Philosophy and Theory -EPAT – editorials & articles – May 2021

Editorials – Free Access

Nesta Devine (2021) Lessons from history: Agnotology and the crown Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1915762

Derek R. Ford & Petar Jandrić (2021) Postdigital Marxism and education Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1930530

Taylor Webb & Petra Mikulan (2021) Escape education Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1926983

Michael A. Peters & Petar Jandrić (2021) Surreal economics, fiscal stimulus, and the financialization of public health: Politics of the covid-19 narrative Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1929170

Chengbing Wang & Michael A. Peters (2021)  Contemporary Chinese Marxism: disciplines, teaching platforms and status quo of basic academic research Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1929171

Articles

Marla Beth Morris (2021) Michel Serres: Divergences Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1917370

Rowena A. Azada-Palacios Hybridity and national identity in post-colonial schools Educational Philosophy and Theory,  doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1920393

Andrew Gibbons, Michael A. Peters, Georgina Tuari Stewart, Marek Tesar, Neil Boland, Viktor Johansson, Nicky de Lautour, Nesta Devine, Nina Hood & Sean Sturm (2021) Infantologies II: Songs of the cradle. An EPAT Collective Writing Project Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1906646

Rachel Anne Buchanan, Daniella Jasmin Forster, Samuel Douglas, Sonal Nakar, Helen J Boon, Treesa Heath, Paul Heyward, Laura D’Olimpio, Joanne Ailwood, Scott Eacott, Sharon Smith, Michael Peters & Marek Tesar (2021) Philosophy of Education in a New Key: exploring new ways of teaching and doing ethics in education in the 21st century Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1880387

Jonghun Kim (2021) ‘In numbers we trust’: Statistical data as governing technologies in the era of student achievement and school accountability Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1920394

Emile Bojesen (2021) Educational resistance Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1927702

Bo Wang (2021) Research on the teaching innovation model of undergraduate musical ecology course under computer network environment Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1905516

Chris Peers (2021) Catastrophe or apocalypse? The anthropocenologist as pedagogue

Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1903434

Brandon Sherman & Annela Teemant (2021) Agency, identity, power: An agentive triad model for teacher action Educational Philosophy and Theory,  doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1929174

Eryong, Xue & Jian Li (2021) Optimizing and improving the strategical development of urban schools in China: A policy analysis Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1929169

José María Ariso (2021) The teacher as persuader: On the application of Wittgenstein’s notion of ‘persuasion’ in educational practice Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1930529

Julien Kloeg & Liesbeth Noordegraaf-Eelens (2021)  Ambiguous authority: reflections on Hannah Arendt’s concept of authority in education Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1930864

Book Reviews

Victoria O’Sullivan (2021) Tara Page’s Placemaking: A New Materialist Theory of Pedagogy: A Becoming Book-Review Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1917366

Jeremy Knox (2021) Posthumanism and the digital university: Texts, bodies and materialities (Lesley Gourlay, 2020), Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1923004

Review Symposium

Paul Gibbs, Claudia Alejandra Rozas Gomez & Petra Mikulan (2021)  Claudia Rozas Gómez, Paul Gibbs and Petra Mikulan on Peter Roberts and Herner Saeverot’s Education and the limits of reason: Reading Dostoevsky, Tolstoy and Nabokov, with a response from the authors, Roberts, P., & Saeverot, H. (2018 Routledge) . Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1923005

 

The Case for Academic Plagiarism Education – Webinar

Date: 2021-05-21

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRIDAY, 21 MAY 2021

11:30 AM – 01:00 PM (IST) |            6:00 PM – 7:30 PM (NZ)

Join us on ZOOM  https://us06web.zoom.us/j/84904116855 Password: JGU

RSVP: Ms. Sapna Sharma, Phd@jgu.edu.in

 

Educational Philosophy and Theory -EPAT – editorials & articles – April 2021

Editorials – Free Access

David Neilson (2021) Reading Marx again Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1906648

Henry A. Giroux (2021) Trumpism and the challenge of critical education Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1884066

Michael A. Peters (2021) The Americanisation of human rights Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1914895

David Coady (2021) Conspiracy theory as heresy Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1917364

Articles

Rauno Huttunen & Leena Kakkori (2021) Heidegger’s critique of the technology and the educational ecological imperative Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1903436

Dianne Mulcahy  (2021) Enacting affirmative ethics in education: a materialist/posthumanist framing Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1907744

Michael A. Peters, Liz Jackson, Ruyu Hung, Carl Mika, Rachel Anne Buchanan, Marek Tesar, Tina Besley, Nina Hood (open review), Sean Sturm (open review), Bernadette Farrell (open comment), Andrew Madjar (open comment) & Taylor Webb (open comment) (2021) The case for academic plagiarism education: A PESA Executive collective writing project Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1897574

Bakhtiar Shabani Varaki, Alireza Sadeqzadeh Qamsari, Meisam Sefidkhosh, Seyed Mahdi Sajjadi, Reza Mohammadi Chaboki, Tahereh Javidi Kalatehjafarabadi, Hojjat Saffarheidari, Meisam Mohammadamini, Omid Karimzadeh, Ramazan Barkhordari, Saeid Zarghami-Hamrah, Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar (2021) Philosophy of education in a new key: Reflection on higher education in Iran Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1905517

Jong-pil Yoon (2021) Is historical thinking unnatural? Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1914584

Chloe Humphreys, Sean Blenkinsop & Bob Jickling (2021) Education, sustainable or otherwise, as simulacra: A symphony of Baudrillard Educational Philosophy and Theory,  doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1915125

Masami Yamamoto  (2021) The tendency of educational thought of “the ancient studies” in the Edo Confucianism: A focus on the thought differences between Ito Jinsai and Ogyu Sorai Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1914583

Tadashi Nishihira & Jeremy Rappleye (2021)Unlearning as (Japanese) learning Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1906644

Omar Moumni (2021) Neither Occidentalism nor Orientalism in Al Hajari’s Nasir al- Din ala al-Qawm al-Kafirin 1611–1613  Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1915123

Anat Wilson  (2021)Towards an understanding of metacognition(ing) through an agential realism framework Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1915763

John Weaver (2021) Serres and the university Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1917371

John Weaver (2021) Serres’ science Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1917369

Nuraan Davids  (2021) Academic freedom and the fallacy of a post-truth era Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1917363

Yasuo Imai (2021) Material basis of learning: From a debate on teaching the area of a parallelogram in 1980s Japan Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1906645

Tal Gilead & Gideon Dishon (2021) Rethinking future uncertainty in the shadow of COVID 19: Education, change, complexity and adaptability Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1920395

Robin A. Bellingham (2021) Reef pedagogy: A narrative of vitality, intra-dependence, and haunting Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1917365

Joel White (2021) On significative exergy: toward a logomachics of education Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1903435

Morimichi Kato (2021) Introduction Distance matters: a hermeneutical approach to Japanese humanistic traditions Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1920321

Eryong Xue & Jian Li  (2021) Cultivating high-level innovative talents by integration of science and education in China: a strategic policy perspective Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1918545

John A. Weaver & Marla Beth Morris  (2021) Michel Serres: a pedagogical life Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1917368

UN Sustainable Development Goals: SDG 4 – Quality Education – International Webinar

Date: 2021-05-09

SDG #4 – Quality Education Workshop

9th May 2021 2PM – 5PM IST – India Std Time

✅✅ Register Here Now

#sdg #sdg4 #qualityeducation #education #un #unsdg #globalgoals

📕 You can probably #read and #write well, But do you know that there are a lot of children who can’t read or write? A #quality #education is the starting point for everything.

 

 

 

 

 

 

📘Over 265 million children are currently out of school. In many cases, even the children who do attend school lack basic reading and math literacy.

 

📗 Join with us to learn more about the SDG #4,  gain #insights and learn how you can take #actions to increase Quality Education. Our Webinar will contain #speeches from #internationally #inspiring speakers around the world and much more content that will help everyone to achieve this SDG together.

 

📙We also offer an important e-Certificate for successful completion

 

 

 

PESA Midwinter Zoomfest

Date: 2021-08-27
Dear PESA Members
We are excited to announce our event, PESA Midwinter Zoomfest, that will be held on Friday, 27 August 2021 (10am – 12pm AEST; 12pm – 2pm NZST).
This event will give you opportunities to present, view presentations, attend panel discussions, and hear our keynote speakers, Carl Mika and Liz Jackson.
For more information about the event, please see the flyer.
We look forward to being able to connect again as a society.

If you’d like to take part, please join PESA 

Ngā mihi

Andrew Madjar

Secretary
PESA

Postdigital Humans: Transitions, Transformation and Transcendence – new book

 

Postdigital Humans: Transitions, Transformation and Transcendence, edited by Maggi  Savin-Baden, (Springer, 2021) is the first book in the Postdigital Science and Education book series.  It illustrates that the development and use of postdigital humans is occurring rapidly, but often in unexpected ways and spaces, and explores approaches to developing and using postdigital humans and the impact they are having on a postdigital world. This book presents current research and practices at a time when education is changing rapidly with digital, technological advances. In particular, it outlines the major challenges faced by today’s employers, developers, teachers, researchers, priests and philosophers such as the possibility for using postdigital humans for teaching, training and practice.

The first section of the book begins with an exploration of the ideas and concepts associated with postdigital humans. The second section provides both a practical and philosophical stance toward the use of postdigital humans in education. The final section explores the overlapping constructs of philosophy, ethics and religion. Postdigital Humans: Transitions, Transformation and Transcendence in many ways brings together concerns over agency, the wider complex ecology of techno-capitalist relations, notions of individual self-determination and ways in which humanity needs to come to understand and act in the postdigital world.

CFP – Special issue of ACCESS: Contemporary Issues in Education – Leadership for Justice.

 

Call for papers 

Leadership for Justice

‘Leadership’ studies have focussed around the relationship between the leaders and the led; but what about the wider implications, the consequences for the not-led? How can leadership become more oriented to wider issues of social justice rather than to the efficacy of their leadership within their own institutions? The current world amply rewards those who can lead their followers, be they in corporations, schools or universities, to success in competitive terms. Can leadership success be evaluated in terms more embedded in notions of ethics, aesthetics, and social justice?

You are invited to submit a paper (up to 6,000 words) or commentary (approximately 2,000 words) on these issues. To indicate your interest, please submit a brief abstract of your paper by June 1, 2021 to accesseditorial@pesaagora.com. Full manuscripts will be due by September 1, 2021.

We look forward to receiving your submission.

Land Education, Place, and Climate Justice in Early Childhood – RECE virtual event

Kia ora koutou

Reconceptualizing Early Childhood Education (RECE) invites you to join us for the second event in RECE’s (In)justices and Counteractions in Early Childhood Contexts virtual engagement series.

 

Land Education, Place, and Climate Justice in Early Childhood.    REGISTER NOW
Wed, April 28, 2021
8:00 PM – 9:30 PM Eastern (New York)

Thur, 29 April, 2021
10:00-11:30 AM Australian Eastern Time

Please convert to your local time zone via this link

This event, featuring Diana Gómez, Anna Lees, Jenny Ritchie, Catherine Hamm and Jeanne Marie Iorio, and moderated by Megan Bang, will cover issues and concerns with Land Education, Place, and Climate Justice as they relate to and are impacted by early childhood practices and everyday activisms.

This conversation is a space for minoritised perspectives in political, social, and educational contexts to take root. Central to this discussion is embedding and foregrounding Indigenous, kinship and climate perspectives and relationalities as more than just some alternative, but rather, essential ways to understand the world.

The event includes an audience Q & A as well as a 30-minute informal “salon” conversation session with the audience following the formal program.

You can register for this event on the RECE website

Become a member of the vibrant RECE community: join now!

Educational Philosophy and Theory -EPAT – editorials & articles – March 2021

Editorials – Free Access

Dustin Garlitz & Joseph Zompetti (2021) Critical theory as Post-Marxism: The Frankfurt School and beyond,  Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1876669

Dustin Garlitz (2021) Neo-Kantianism as philosophy of culture: Cassirer, Simmel, and the Bildung tradition in contemporary German intellectual thought Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1879052

Articles

Hirotaka Sugita (2021) Re-envisioning personhood from the perspective of Japanese philosophy: Watsuji Tetsuro’s Aidagara-based ethics Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1897571

Trinadh Nookathoti  (2021) The dichotomy in India’s education system – A macro level analysis Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1897568

Reiko Muroi (2021) Literacy and tactility: An experience of writing in Kuzuhara Kôtô Nikki (Kuzuhara Kôtô’s diary) Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1897572

Virgilio A. Rivas (2021) Stiegler and the task of tertiary retention: on the amateur as an educational subject Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1897569

Satoji Yano & Jeremy Rappleye (2021) Global citizens, cosmopolitanism, and radical relationality: Towards dialogue with the Kyoto School? Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1897570

Ciarán Ó Gallchóir & Oliver McGarr (2021) An Irish perspective on initial teacher education: How teacher educators can respond to an awareness of the ‘absurd’ Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1901080

Mike Ward (2021) Ilyenkov’s ideal: Can we bank on it? Educational Philosophy and Theory doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1901687

Chris Duncan, Minkang Kim, Soohyun Baek, Kwan Yiu Yoyo Wu & Derek Sankey (2021) The limits of motivation theory in education and the dynamics of value-embedded learning (VEL) Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1897575

Morimichi Kato (2021) The educational function of Japanese arts: An approach to environmental philosophy Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1904396

Scott Webster (2021) Spiritual education for a post-capitalist society Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1901686

Michael A. Peters, Alexander J. Means, David P. Ericson, Shivali Tukdeo, Joff P. N. Bradley, Liz Jackson, Guanglun Michael Mu, Timothy W. Luke & Greg William Misiaszek (2021) The China-threat discourse, trade, and the future of Asia. A Symposium Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1897573

Joff P. N. Bradley (2021) On the curation of negentropic forms of knowledge Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1906647

João M. Paraskeva (2021) ‘Did COVID-19 exist before the scientists?’ Towards curriculum theory now Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1888288

 

Global Classroom: Globalization and Higher Education Internationalization – Speaker Series

In order to explore the futures of international higher education post COVID-19, in particular, the pedagogical strategies of “Internationalization at Home,” the Institute of Education at Xiamen University offers ‘Globalization and Higher Education’ bilingual graduate course in Spring 2021. Setting up as a ‘global classroom’, the course uses both online and offline hybrid learning mode, in order to build a Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) community.

Focusing on ‘Globalization and Higher Education Internationalization’ renowned scholars are invited to give lectures and interact with the participants on a series of topics. The COIL community read and discuss relevant literature and apply what they learn from the speaker series to collaborate on small group projects of shared interests. The 1st lecture, on March 23rd, by Dr. Philip Altbach,Boston College Center for International Higher Education, focusing on “The Future of Higher Education in the PostCovid World—International Perspectives” drew over 180 participants from China, USA, Canada, Cameroon, Tanzania, Malaysia, Japan, Australia, and other countries.

The speaker series is open to faculty and students as well as alumni of the Institute of Education, faculty and students in Xiamen University Xiang’an Campus, Zhang Zhou campus, and Malaysia campus, as well as alumni from both home and abroad.

Speaker Series:

1. 8-9am, Tuesday, March 30th (Beijing Time) Dr. Darla Deardorff, Executive Director of the Association of International Education Administrators; Research Scholar at Duke University:

“Global and Intercultural Competencies: Student Learning Outcomes in Internationalization of Higher Education”

2. 8-9am, Tuesday, April 6th (Beijing Time) Dr. Brett Perozzi, Vice President for Student Affairs, Weber State University:

“Student Affairs and Services in Global Perspective”

3. 8-9am, Tuesday, April 13th (Beijing Time) Dr. Reitumetse Obakeng Mabokela, Vice Provost for International Affairs and Global Strategies, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

“Diversity, Equity, and Inclusive Internationalization”

Ways to Join the Global Classroom:

  1. Online Lecture (8:00-9:00): Download Zoom-Meeting ID: 951 8147 1143 (Passcode: 237246)
  2. Offline Class (8:00-9:40): Limited Number, Application Required. Please email your personal information with a brief participation rationale at sophycxy@xmu.edu.cn (Professor Sophy)
  3. After-class online discussion on Canvas learning system (Anytime): Unlimited Number, Application Required. Please email your name, email address and a brief participation rationale at sophycxy@xmu.edu.cn (Professor Sophy)

If you would like to access to the course material, please contact Professor Sophy at QQ: 396536485.

Special thanks to Weber State University for sharing this valuable learning opportunity with Xiamen University community.

 

Sophy Cai leading the Global Classroom, Xiamen University, 2021

Bloomsbury Book series – Introductions to World Philosophies

Series Editor Monika Kirloskar-Steinbach

Assistant Series Editor Leah Kalmanson

Regional Editors Nader El- Bizri, James Madaio, Sarah Mattice, Takeshi Morisato, Pascah Mungwini, Omar Rivera and Georgina Stewart

 

Bloomsbury Introductions to World Philosophies delivers primers reflecting exciting new developments in the trajectory of world philosophies. Instead of privileging a single philosophical approach as the basis of comparison, the series provides a platform for diverse philosophical perspectives to accommodate the different dimensions of cross-cultural philosophizing. While introducing thinkers, texts and themes emanating from different world philosophies, each book, in an imaginative and path-breaking way, makes clear how it departs from a conventional treatment of the subject matter. 

Here is a flyer for the first 4 books in the series.

Bloomsbury Introductions to World Philosophies series flyer

 

Daya Krishna and Twentieth-Century Indian Philosophy is an introduction to the work of one of the most significant Indian philosophers of the 20th century. 

 

 

 

Maori Philosophy is a concise introduction, addressing core philosophical issues including Maori notions of the self, the world, epistemology, the form in which Maori philosophy is conveyed, and whether or not Maori philosophy has a teleological agenda. 

 

 

 

A Practical Guide to World Philosophies is a teaching guide for instructors looking to broaden their view of philosophy, diversify their teaching or discover a new way of thinking about our place in the world. 

 

 

Philosophy of Science and The Kyoto School is an introduction to 20th-century Japanese philosophy that uses the founding members of the Kyoto School and their impact on the philosophy of science to explain central ideas. 

Date Extended – Abstracts for online AVP Conference 2021 – ‘Exploring Visual Worlds of Education’ – 9 April

Date: 2021-04-09

**Call for abstracts extended** to April 9

We are now calling on researchers, practitioners, artists, film-makers, producers and innovators, and all those with an interest in educational development, future focused education, education into sustainable futures, teaching innovation, educational and interdisciplinary research in all curriculum areas, and philosophy of education to submit an abstract for the online AVP Conference 2021; ‘Exploring Visual Worlds of Education’.

This event will be a chance for us to not only explore new ways of teaching, learning, being and connecting, but also inspire as well as problematize the current technological shift in education,  developing new understandings of visual cultures, frameworks for engagement and visual modes of production. Following the conference, there will be publishing and production opportunities to share, showcase and learn from others who work with visualities.

Abstracts submission deadline has been extended to April 9, – see link for more details (including submission guidelines). see also the earlier notice in PESA Agora

Environmental Justice and Education – Special Issue, International Studies in Sociology of Education

International Studies in Sociology of Education (ISSE) has a Special Issue on  Environmental Justice and Education, guest editor, Dr. Greg Misiaszek.

AVP Conference June 9-11, 2021 — Exploring Visual Worlds of Education, in context of Crises and New Spaces of Opportunities

The Association for Visual Pedagogies (AVP) Conference June 9-11, 2021 is in collaboration with Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Bergen, Norway:

Exploring Visual Worlds of Education, in context of Crises and New Spaces of Opportunities 

Exploring Visual Worlds of Education  addresses  our ever-shifting global context. The 2021 hybrid conference will feature both asynchronous and synchronous events. The asynchronous events will consist of pre-recorded presentations from the key notes and artistic events.

The paper sessions, symposiums and workshops will be synchronic events following a time and place schedule.  A limited number of workshops will be held on site (Norway, Bergen campus) and can be attended virtually.

If you are interested in ANY aspect of visuality (video, art, film, image) and its relationship to learning this conference is for YOU! It is free to AVP members and you can join by following the links:

AVP Conference registration: https://www.hvl.no/en/research/conference/VisualworldsofEducation/

AVP General Membership (waged): https://visualpedagogies.com/general-membership/

AVP General Membership (unwaged/student): https://visualpedagogies.com/unwaged-membership/

We look forward to seeing you at the conference and perhaps hearing about your work (abstracts close 20 March so the hour is nigh for your submission!). There are also publication opportunities which you can learn about should you wish to publish in our Open Access journal or book series – Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy.

If you wish to discuss any ideas/thoughts, you might have in this regard, please contact  Dr Bridgette Redder

Exploring Visual Worlds of Education_flyer (1)

 

 

 

 

 

Educational Philosophy and Theory -EPAT – editorials & articles – February 2021

Editorials – Free Access

Alexander J. Means (2020) Foucault, biopolitics, and the critique of state reason Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1871895

Timothy W. Luke (2020) Democracy under threat after 2020 national elections in the USA: ‘stop the steal’ or ‘give more to the grifter-in-chief?’ Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1889327

Georgina Tuari Stewart (2020) Academic-Māori-Woman: The impossible may take a little longer Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1892484

Articles

Richard Watermeyer & Michael Tomlinson (2020) Competitive accountability and the dispossession of academic identity: Haunted by an impact phantom Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1880388

Marek Tesar, Michael A. Peters, E. Jayne White, Sonja Arndt, Jennifer Charteris, Aleryk Fricker, Viktor Johansson, Sean Sturm, Nina Hood & Andrew Madjar (2020) Infanticides: The unspoken side of infantologies Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1854730

Ozum Ucok-Sayrak & Nichole Brazelton (2020) Regarding the question of presence in online education: A performative pedagogical perspective Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1880389

Tanu Biswas & Nikolas Mattheis  (2020) Strikingly educational: A childist perspective on children’s civil disobedience for climate justice Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1880390

Anita Sinner (2020) Speculative steps with story shoes: Object itineraries as sensual a-r-tography Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1872019

Nick Peim & Nicholas Stock (2020) Education after the end of the world. How can education be viewed as a hyperobject? Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1882999

Michele Lobo, Laura Bedford, Robin Ann Bellingham, Kim Davies, Anna Halafoff, Eve Mayes, Bronwyn Sutton, Aileen Marwung Walsh, Sharon Stein (open reviewer) & Chloe Lucas (open reviewer) (2020) Earth unbound: Climate change, activism and justice Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1866541

Kathryn Grushka, Miranda Lawry, Ari Chand & Andy Devine (2020) Visual borderlands: Visuality, performance, fluidity and art-science learning Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1859368

Eser Ordem (2020) Exclusionary practices of English language teaching departments in Turkey: radical pedagogy, British colonialism and neoliberalism Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1888710

Sacha Golob (2020) A Heideggerian pedagogy of disruption Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1888712

Marcus A. Lessa, Domício Proença Júnior, Roberto Bartholo & Édison Renato Silva  (2020) Making marks while reading, with some remarks on the challenges posed by the digital world Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1888711

Emmi Bravo Palacios & Maarten Simons (2020) Can I take a look at your notes?: A phenomenological exploration of how university students experience note-taking using paper-based and paperless resources Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1876667

Wisam Kh. Abdul-Jabbar (2020) Diasporicity and intercultural dialectics in Muslim education: Conceptualizing a minorities curriculum (Minhaj Al-Aqalliyyat) Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1892485

Tributes

Michael Matthews, Robert Mackie, Colin Evers, Steve Crump & Paul Hager (2020) James Walker, Philosopher of Education – Five tributes from colleagues Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1884359

Kevin Harris (2020) From the realm where parallel lines meet – Jim Walker: A reminiscence Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1884363

Michael A. Peters & Paul Hager (2020) James (J.C.) Walker: Philosopher of Education – The celebration of a life Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1884362

Book Review

Hongyan Chen (2020) Transformations: Art and the city Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1880890

Obituary

 Jānis T. Ozoliņš (2020) Paul Heywood Hirst (1927-2020) obituary Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1867107

The Epistemology of Deceit in a Postdigital Era: Dupery by Design – New Book 2021

MacKenzie, AlisonRose, JenniferBhatt, Ibrar (Eds.) 2021,  Springer,

This edited book collection in the Postdigital Science and Education Book series (Springer) offers strong theoretical and philosophical insight into how digital platforms and their constituent algorithms interact with belief systems to achieve deception, and how related vices such as lies, bullshit, misinformation, disinformation, and ignorance contribute to deception. This inter-disciplinary collection explores how we can better understand and respond to these problematic practices.

The Epistemology of Deceit in a Postdigital Era: Dupery by Design will be of interest to anyone concerned with deception in a ‘postdigital’ era including fake news, and propaganda online.  The election of populist governments across the world has raised concerns that fake news in online platforms is undermining the legitimacy of the press, the democratic process, and the authority of sources such as science, the social sciences and qualified experts. The global reach of Google, YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, and other platforms has shown that they can be used to create and spread fake and misleading news quickly and without control. These platforms operate and thrive in an increasingly balkanised media eco-system where networks of users will predominantly access and consume information that conforms to their existing worldviews. Conflicting positions, even if relevant and authoritative, are suppressed, or overlooked in everyday digital information consumption. Digital platforms have contributed to the prolific spread of false information, enabled ignorance in online news consumers, and fostered confusion over determining fact from fiction.

The collection explores:

  • Deception, what it is, and how its proliferation is achieved in online platforms.
  • Truth and the appearance of truth, and the role digital technologies play in pretending to represent truth.
  • How we can counter these vices to protect ourselves and our institutions from their potentially baneful effects.

Discursive Habits: Peirce and Cognitive Semiotics – Deakin University webinar

Dates: 2021-03-01 - 2021-03-03

Dr Cathy Legg discusses: Discursive Habits: Peirce and Cognitive Semiotics

International Centre for  Enactivism and Discursive Semiotics, Deakin University, Australia

March 1, 10PM-00AM (CET)

March 2, 8 a.m. Melbourne time.

Enactivism has greatly benefitted contemporary philosophy by demonstrating that the traditional intellectualist ‘act-content’ model of intentionality is simply insufficient, and showing how minds may be built from world-involving bodily habits. Many enactivists have assumed that this must entail non-representationalism concerning at least basic minds. Here I argue that such anti-intellectualism is overly constraining, and not necessary. I sketch an alternative enactivism which draws on Peirce’s pragmatic semiotics, and understands signs as habits whose connections with rich schemas of possible experience render them subject to increasing degrees of self-control. The talk’s key innovation is to align this cyclical process of habit cultivation with Peirce’s representationalist icon-index-symbol distinction, in a manner which I will explain.

For details and to link to the meeting go to : Cathy Legg_March1st

Postdigital Humans: Transitions, Transformations and Transcendence New book 2021

Postdigital Humans: Transitions, Transformations and Transcendence (Savin-Baden, Maggi (Ed.), 2021, Springer) is the first book in the new book series Postdigital Science and Education.

This book explores approaches to developing and using postdigital humans and the impact they are having on a postdigital world. It presents current research and practices at a time when education is changing rapidly with digital, technological advances. In particular, it outlines the major challenges faced by today’s employers, developers, teachers, researchers, priests and philosophers. The book examines conceptions of postdigital humans and studies the issue in connection with ethics and employment, as well as from perspectives such as philosophy and religion.

Editor: Maggi Savin-Baden, is Professor of Higher Education, University of Worcester, UK. She has been research learning in innovative spaces for over 20 years gaining grants from  funder that include The Leverhulme Trust, Esmee Fairbairn, JISC  and  the Ministry of Defence. She has authored, coauthored and edited 17 books to  date with 2 more due out in 2020-21. In her spare time she is a baker, runner and triathlete.

Writing for Publication:  Liminal Reflections for Academics New Book 2021

Writing for Publication:  Liminal Reflections for Academics

Georgina Tuari Stewart, Nesta Devine, Leon Benade (Eds.) 2021, Springer

PESA Agora is pleased to announce this new book edited by three PESA members.

This book focuses on academic writing and how academics who are experts in their fields can translate their expertise into publishable form. The magnitude and speed of the changes that are transforming the global academic landscape produce an ongoing need for literature that interprets the nature of academic work. This book arises from the background discipline of Education, which is a relatively new university subject that draws on the entire knowledge spectrum from the fine arts to the natural sciences. Each chapter addresses an aspect of the conditions of written academic labour in an age of digital publishing: its nature, how it works, and guidance for successful navigation. This book will provide helpful guidance to graduate students, researchers and teachers in universities and higher education, who are united by the challenges of this new world of academic publishing.

​Editors: 

Georgina Tuari Stewart is an Associate Professor in Te Kura Mātauranga School of Education, at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) in Aotearoa New Zealand. Researches topics at the overlap between knowledge, culture and education, e.g. Māori science education, biculturalism, bilingualism and Māori philosophy. Recently completed a Marsden funded research project to investigate doctoral theses written entirely in te reo Māori. Co-Editor of Springer journal New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies (NZJES), and an Associate Editor of the Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand (JRSNZ) and Educational Philosophy and Theory (EPAT). New book: Māori Philosophy: Indigenous Thinking from Aotearoa (Bloomsbury, 2020).

Nesta Devine is Professor of Philosophy of Education at Auckland University of Technology (AUT) in Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand. As an immigrant she is interested in the interplay of ethnicities and cultures in our society, and consequently focuses on ideas concerning power and subjectivity in educational institutions. She is a Fellow of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia, Co-Editor of the New Zealand Journal of Teachers’ Work, Reviews editor of New Zealand Journal of Education Research, Editor of the Royal Bhutan Journal of Education and Development, and Associate Editor of Educational Philosophy and Theory (EPAT).

Leon Benade is an Associate Professor in the School of Education of the Auckland University of Technology. His research interests are teachers’ work, school policy, ethics, philosophy in schools, critical pedagogy, and the New Zealand Curriculum, with a current focus on Innovative Learning Environments (ILE). Leon is a co-editor of the New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies and the New Zealand Journal of Teachers’ Work. He is author of From Technicians to Teachers: Ethical Teaching in the Context of Globalized Education Reform (Continuum, 2012) and Being a Teacher in the 21st Century: A Critical New Zealand Study (Springer, 2017).

Dupery by Design: Epistemology of Deceit in a Postdigital Era – 2021

Date: 2021-03-16

 

 

Dupery by Design: The Epistemology of Deceit in a Postdigital Era and the critical role of Higher Education

EVENT: showcases a diverse collection of contributions by authors of the forthcoming edited book, Dupery by Design: Epistemology of Deceit in a Postdigital Era (MacKenzie, Rose & Bhatt, 2021, Springer – part of the PDSE book series),  will take part in this online event,  Hosted by: SHRE, UK.

Papers will tackle a number of critical issues in relation to the current crisis of trust and will lend theoretical and philosophical insight into how digital technologies interact with belief systems to achieve deception, and its related epistemic vices: lies, dupery, misinformation, disinformation, and ignorance. The event’s underscoring themes include:

  • How online platforms are designed to exploit particular vices such as close-mindedness, epistemic nihilism, insouciance, etc. and contribute to the power and dissemination of deception;
  • Deception: what is it? Is there anything peculiar about the times in which we live that should raise special concerns about the proliferation of fake news, lies, bullshit and other such vices online?
  • How do our individual and collective epistemologies interact with digital technologies to produce deceit?
  • How can we counter epistemic vices online, and protect ourselves and our institutions from their potentially baneful effects?
  • Can deception ever be justified? Is there anything to be learned from mass propaganda and deceit in other historical periods?

Discussants: Alison MacKenzie, Ibrar Bhatt, Jennifer Rose (Queen’s University Belfast)

Plenary speaker: Alison MacKenzie (Queen’s University Belfast)

Check out the link to read more about this event.

Network: Digital University
Date(s): Tuesday, 16 March 2021
Times: 14:00-16:30
Signup Deadline: Friday, 12 March 2021
Location: Online event, link will be provided
Lunch Provided: No
Spaces Left: Places available
Prices: Members: Free, Guests: Free

Book online now

 

 

Educational Philosophy and Theory -EPAT – editorials & articles – December 2020  and January 2021

Editorials – Free Access

Michael A Peters, Susanne Brighouse, Marek Tesar, Sean Sturm & Liz Jackson. (2020) The open peer review experiment in Educational Philosophy and Theory (EPAT) Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1846519

Michael A. Peters, Marek Tesar, Liz Jackson, Tina Besley, Petar Jandrić, Sonja Arndt & Sean Sturm. (2020)  Exploring the philosophy and practice of collective writing Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1854731

Michael A. Peters, Petar Jandrić & Sarah Hayes. (2020)  Biodigital technologies and the bioeconomy: The Global New Green Deal? Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1861938

Michael A. Peters, Petar Jandrić & Sarah Hayes. (2020)  Postdigital-biodigital: An emerging configuration Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1867108

 

Articles

Jian Li & Eryong Xue. (2020)  Mapping the education policy of foreign faculty for creating world-class universities in China: Advantage, conflict, and ambiguity Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1863213

David R. Cole. (2020)  Caught between the air and earth: a schizoanalytic critique of the role of the education in the development of a new airport Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1864322

Farah Ahmed. (2020)  Authority, autonomy and selfhood in Islamic education – Theorising Shakhsiyah Islamiyah as a dialogical Muslim-self Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1863212

Joyce Leysen. (2020)  Confusions that make us think? An invitation for public attention to conceptual confusion on the neuroscience-education bridge Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1865920

Bilal Hamamra, Nabil Alawi & Abdel Karim Daragmeh. (2020)   Covid-19 and the decolonisation of education in Palestinian universities Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1865921

Nuraan Davids & Yusef Waghid. (2020)   Muslim schooling in South Africa and the need for an educational crisis? Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1867109

Jayne White & Mikhail Gradovski. (2020) The legacy of the suprematist square for a sensing pedagogy: A non-objective creative contemplation for education Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1861939

Andrew Gibbons, Michael A. Peters, Andrea Delaune, Petar Jandrić, Amy N. Sojot, David W. Kupferman, Marek Tesar, Viktor Johansson, Marta Cabral, Nesta Devine & Nina Hood Infantasies: An EPAT collective project. (2020) Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1860749

Wiebe Koopal & Joris Vlieghe. (2020)  Seeing through a glass, darkly? Towards an educational iconomy of the digital screen Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1872018

Erhan Şimşek. (2020)  Philosophical roots of argumentative writing in higher education Educational Philosophy and Theory,  doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1865922

Mitja Sardoč, C. A. J. Coady, Vittorio Bufacchi, Fathali M. Moghaddam, Quassim Cassam, Derek Silva, Nenad Miščević, Gorazd Andrejč, Zdenko Kodelja, Boris Vezjak, Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar  Philosophy of education in a new key: On radicalization and violent extremism. (2020) Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2020.1861937

Jian Li & Eryong Xue. (2020)  Rethinking how to create world-class universities in China: A policy mapping perspective Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1876668

Alberto Sánchez-Rojo. (2020)   Waiting before hoping: An educational approach to the experience of waiting Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2021.1872020

Liz Jackson: Beyond Virtue: The Politics of Educating Gratitude and Humility

Date: 2021-02-22

 

You’re cordially invited to the following online (via Zoom) Education University of Hong Kong, International Education Seminar,   co-hosted with the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA)
on
Monday 22 February 2021 from 11:00-12:15, Hong Kong time (GMT+8)
By Professor Liz Jackson
Chair: Dr Stephen Chatelier

 

To attend please register here by Friday 19 February 2021

 

PaTHES  Online Club Meets 

Philosophy and Theory in Higher Education Society

     3rd SEASON THEME: Loneliness and  Collegiality

     co-lead by  Tessa DeLaquil  and Carola Boehm

    PaTHES online meets are back for a third season. We are rotating our timezones and facilitators to accommodate our international community, so after seasons facilitated for Europe, then Australasia, we are now turning to the Americas. So put this slot in your diary and feel free to bring your coffee, tea and discussion points.  Everyone is welcome, and as our various regions are still coping with various lockdowns, we are keeping these Online Club Meets still open to the public.

Our first online meet will be Tues 16th Feb and this season will finish in the week  of 23rd March.

Link to the Online Club Meets, at https://pathes.org/onlinemeets/

The time for each the of the 6 sessions of the third season will be:

UTC  City Season 3 (2021)

16th Feb to 23rd Mar

UTC -8 Los Angeles Tuesday 11am
UTC -5 New York Tuesday 2pm
UTC +13 Wellington Tuesday 8am
UTC +0 London Tuesday 7pm
UTC +1 Aarhus Tuesday 8pm
UTC +11 Sydney Tuesday 6am

OUR THEME: For season 3 of the online club meets, the selected theme is “Loneliness and Collegiality.”  In her essay titled “Ideology and Terror,” Hannah Arendt parallels isolation in the political sphere to loneliness in the social sphere, such that isolation occurs when “the political sphere of [our] lives, where [we] act together in the pursuit of a common concern, is destroyed,” while loneliness is “the situation in which I as a person feel myself deserted by all human companionship.” On the other hand, collegiality has been defined in higher education as relationships based on a shared commitment to a common purpose in higher education (Rowland, 2008).

So then, what might be this common purpose? And how might we build relationships in spite of the fractured nature of societal relationships, politically and geographically? What could be the effects on the university and the purpose of the university due to the loneliness experienced by its constituents – by faculty, staff, and students? Come join us in our discussions on this theme this season!

INTRODUCING THIS SEASON’S CO-LEADS:

  • Tessa DeLaquil is a PhD student and research assistant at the Center for International Higher Education (CIHE), Boston College. Her research interests include the philosophy of higher education, considering secularism, pluralism, and political theory as conceptual bases for ethical practice in international higher education and the internationalization of research.
  • Carola Boehm is Professor of Arts and Higher Education at Staffordshire University. Her research focusses on the role that universities play in our creative societies and our creative economy.

World Class Universities – A Contested Concept – New book

World Class Universities – A Contested Concept

Editors: Sharon Rider, Michael A. Peters, Mats Hyvönen, Tina Besley

This open access book (16 chapters) integrates a broad array of conceptual, theoretical and empirical analyses of The World Class University from the humanities and social sciences. It focuses on the dimensions of the discourse of ‘The World Class University’, its alleged characteristics, and its policy expressions. It offers a broad overview of the historical background and current trajectory of the world-class-university construct. It also deepens the theoretical discussion, and points a way forward out of present impasses resulting from the pervasive use and abuse of the notion of “world-class” and related terms in the discourse of quality assessment. The book includes approaches and results from fields of inquiry not otherwise prominent in Higher Education studies, including philosophy and media studies, as well as sociology, anthropology, educational theory.
The growing impact of global rankings and their strategic use in the restructuring of higher education systems to increase global competitiveness has led to a ‘reputation race’ and the emergence of the global discourse of world class universities. The discourse of world class universities has rapid uptake in East Asian countries, with China recently refining its strategy. This book provides insights into this process and its future development

The eBook is available here:  https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-981-15-7598-3

Educational Philosophy and Theory -EPAT – editorials & articles – November 2020 

Editorials – Free Access

Wang Chengbing. (2020) Reclaiming Postmodern Confucianism through Narrative and Edification Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1845138

Babette Babich. (2020) Nietzsche: Looking right, reading left Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1840974

Michael A. Peters, Marek Tesar, Liz Jackson & Tina Besley. (2020)

Postmodernism in the afterlife Educational Philosophy and Theory, doi.org/10.1080/00131857.2019.1686947

Articles

Duck-Joo Kwak & Eun Ju Park. (2020) Mediating process for human agency in science education: For man’s new relation to nature in latour’s ontology of politics Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1838273

Michael A. Peters & David Neilson.  (2020) Theorising immaterial labor: Toward creativity, co(labor)ation and collective intelligence Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1840349

Janet Orchard , Philip Gaydon , Kevin Williams , Pip Bennett , Laura D’Olimpio , Raşit Çelik , Qasir Shah , Christoph Neusiedl , Judith Suissa , Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar. (2020) Philosophy of education in a new key: A ‘Covid Collective’ of the Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain (PESGB) Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1838274

Cong Lin & Liz Jackson. (2020) Sinophobia in Hong Kong News Media Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1848537

Andrew P. Carlin & Ricardo Moutinho. (2020) Teaching and learning moments as subjectively problematic: Foundational assumptions and methodological entailmentsEducational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1848536

Hideyuki Ichikawa. (2020) A theory of hope in critical pedagogy: An interpretation of Henry Giroux Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1840973

Ingrid Andersson. (2020) The subject in posthumanist theory: Retained rather than dethroned  Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1851190

Klas Roth , Lia Mollvik , Rama Alshoufani , Rebecca Adami , Katy Dineen , Fariba Majlesi , Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar  (2020) Philosophy of education in a new key: Constraints and possibilities in present times with regard to dignity Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1851189

Pandemic Education: A Double Issue of Knowledge Cultures

Pandemic education refers not only to how we educate ourselves and others about the pandemic, but also – and more importantly – to how the pandemic educates us. To put it in the terms of the question that the articles in these two special issues on pandemic education address: how can educators explore and enact a philosophy of education that speaks to the care, critique and collective responsibility demanded by the Covid-19 pandemic?

The two issues of Knowledge Cultures on Pandemic Education (2020) bring together educators from across the globe to respond to the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic. They are available through Proquest Central or Gale Academic Onefile.

Special issue editors:

Pandemic Education issue 1: Knowledge Cultures8(2) [link; follow the doi links for a preview of the articles]

Pandemic Education issue 2: Knowledge Cultures8(3) [link; follow the doi link of the articles for their abstracts]

  1. Pandemic Education (Sean Sturm, University of Auckland, Andrew Gibbons, AUT University, & Michael A. Peters, Beijing Normal University) doi:10.22381/KC8320201
  2. The Pragmatic Nature of the Virus and its Biopolitical Drive (Marco A. Jiménez, National Autonomous University of Mexico) doi:10.22381/KC8320202
  3. Capital Immunodeficiency and the Viral Contagion of Capitalism (Jason J. Wallin, University of Alberta, & Jennifer A. Sandlin, Arizona State University) doi:10.22381/KC8320203
  4. Will We Learn from COVID-19? Ecopedagogical Calling (Un)heard (Greg William Misiaszek, Beijing Normal University) doi:10.22381/KC8320204
  5. The Quiet Earth: Re-Functioning Socio-material Knowledge in the Crisis of the Pandemic (Emit Snake-Beings, Fiji National University) doi:10.22381/KC8320205
  6. Plague, Pedagogy and Pleasure: Creative Interventions in Higher Education (Tatiana Chemi, Aalborg University) doi:10.22381/KC8320206
  7. Immunized Community and Biopolitics in Times of Pandemic (Ana Maria Valle, National Autonomous University of Mexico) doi:10.22381/KC8320207
  8. International Higher Education and Global Citizenship Education: The Rise of Critical Cosmopolitanism’s ‘Personhood’ in the Age of COVID-19 (Benjamin Green, Beijing Normal University) doi:10.22381/KC8320208
  9. An Ethic of Care for People with Disabilities during the COVID-19 Pandemic in China: Towards Greater Social Justice (Wangqian Fu, Meng Deng & Li Cheng, Beijing Normal University) doi:10.22381/KC8320209
  10. COVID-19 and Disparities in Education: Collective Responsibility Can Address Inequities (Fawzia Reza, American College of Education) doi:10.22381/KC83202010
  11. Pandemic Education as an ‘Education-against-Thoughtlessness’: Creating Collective Responsibility against Self-Interest (Beaujorne Sirad A. Ramirez, University of the Philippines) doi:10.22381/KC83202011
  12. COVID-19: The Changing Face of Global Citizenship and the Rise of Pandemic Citizenship (Stephanie Hollings, Beijing Normal University) doi:10.22381/KC83202012
  13. Individual Interests, Community Responsibility and Public Power (Wener Zheng, Beijing Normal University) doi:10.22381/KC83202013
  14. COVID Scholar-Activism in Miniature: A Peep-Hole Diorama Letter Play (Lauren Ila Misiaszek, Beijing Normal University) doi:10.22381/KC83202014

COPE Forum – Dec 15 – Predatory publishing: where do we go from here?

Date: 2020-12-15

December Forum  – follows the usual format where we discuss a topic of interest to our members, followed by members’ cases presented for discussion and advice from all those participating in the Forum. This month the discussion topic is ‘Predatory publishing: where do we go from here?’.

The Forum is for COPE members. EPAT is a member of COPE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

COPE drafted a discussion paper on predatory publishing in 2019, and the dialogue has turned to more practice based solutions.

What are the next steps that COPE, or other industry organisations, might consider as a response to the continued flourishing and growth of predatory journals, conferences, and publishers?

 

Questions for COPE Forum

  • Should COPE use its criteria for membership as an instrument to evaluate standards of scholarly publishing vehicles for the purpose of informing authors, peer reviewers, readers, scholars invited to serve on editorial boards, and universities evaluating scholarly productivity?
  • Should COPE and/or other industry organisations form a global compact of signatories to commit to the practice of research and publication integrity and further to the active marginalisation of predatory publishing within the scholarly communities of universities, editors, and publishers?
  • Should COPE and/or other industry organisations act as a third party retraction service for authors who have unknowingly published with a predatory publisher which will neither withdraw nor retract the articles at the request of the authors?

This will be discussed at the start of the Forum with guest speaker Dr Kelly Cobey who will describe the Authenticator Project, being developed by the Centre for Journalology, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Canada.

READ MORE AND COMMENT

 

2020 STAR Conference – Shaping a Humane World – Dec 8

Dates: 2020-12-08 - 2020-12-10

Conference:  “Shaping a Humane World: Global Higher Education Perspectives: STAR Scholars Network envisions a humane and just world” — December 8th, This year’s annual conference celebrates the people who are doing it in many ways and will culminate with a very special event. We will be hosting Professor Noam Chomsky on his 92nd birthday and honoring his life as a person who helped shape a humane world. A Noam Chomsky Global Connections Awards will be announced during this event.

Disrupting Hate in Education: Teacher Activists, Democracy, and Global Pedagogies of Disruption – New Book

Edited by Rita Verma & Michael W. Apple

We  are pleased to announce the publication of our book Disrupting Hate in Education.

This book aims to identify and respond to the ideological forms of hate and fear that are present in schools, which echo larger nativist and populist agendas. Contributions to this volume are international in scope, providing powerful examples from US schools and communities, examining anti-extremism work in the UK, the “saffronization” of schools in India, struggles to re-orient the villainization of teachers in Brazil, and more. Written by a dynamic group of activist educators and critical researchers, chapters demonstrate how conservative mobilizations around collective identities gain momentum, and how these mobilizations can be interrupted. Out of these interruptions come new opportunities to practice a critically democratic education that hinges upon risk-taking, deep dialogue, and creating a space for common dignity.

It is now available to order from www.routledge.com, simply enter the code BSE3P at the checkout to receive 20% off your next purchase.

QTimes – Journal of Education, Technology and Social Studies

Date: 2020-11-25

CFP for Vol 1/2021: 

Research perspectives on Artificial Intelligence and education of QTimes – Journal of Education, Technology and SocialStudies is online.

Research perspectives on Artificial Intelligence and Education Recent developments on Artificial Intelligence (AI) allowed to define new systems to collect and process empirical data that involve also educational research by a multi-perspective approach. Currently, the level of digitalization of schools is increasing the amount of big data, that stimulate new AI models based on the analysis of contents and processes in different fields. A first area, for example, relates to the creation of intelligent teaching/learning environments, personalizable and oriented towards inclusive training systems; able to guarantee an overall access to knowledge, to identify significant models and transform them into structured knowledge to improve both the school organization and classroom teaching.

Go to the pdf for link for the call on Research perspectives on Artificial Intelligence and Education:

Deadlines:

Abstract proposal: November 30th, 2020

Approval of the abstract: by December 7th, 2020

Submission of the paper: by January 7th, 2020

Refereeing and communication of the results: January 22th, 2020

Time allowed for changes and modifications requested by Referees, in case of approval: January 31th, 2020

Conclusion of editing and publication: February 10th, 2020

New Directions in the Philosophy of Education – Routledge Book Series

Series Editors: Michael A. Peters, Gert Biesta, Liz Jackson

This book series is devoted to the exploration of new directions in the philosophy of education. After the linguistic turn, the cultural turn, and the historical turn, where might we go? Does the future promise a digital turn with a greater return to connectionism, biology and biopolitics based on new understandings of system theory and knowledge ecologies? Does it foreshadow a genuinely alternative radical global turn based on a new openness and interconnectedness? Does it leave humanism behind or will it reengage with the question of the human in new and unprecedented ways? How should philosophy of education reflect new forces of globalization? How can it become less Anglocentric and develop a greater sensitivity to other traditions, languages, and forms of thinking and writing, including those that are not rooted in the canon of Western philosophy but in other traditions that share the ‘love of wisdom’ that characterizes the wide diversity within Western philosophy itself.

This series comprises texts that explore, identify and articulate new directions in the philosophy of education. It aims to build bridges, both geographically and temporally: bridges across different traditions and practices and bridges towards a different future for philosophy of education.

CFP -New Directions in Phil of Ed

To discuss submitting a proposal for the series, please contact Michael Peters, or Gert Biesta  or Liz Jackson

For a full list of titles, please visit: New Directions in the Philosophy of Education

Routledge Open Access Research – Books and Chapters

The Taylor & Francis Books Open Access initiative allows authors and their funders to publish open access (OA) single- or co-authored books, edited collections and individual chapters. Upon publication, Taylor & Francis Books Open Access titles are made available in digital format to read and download freely under a Creative Commons license. Click on the subject area to discover more open access content in your field

If you have any questions regarding an Open Access Books project, feel free to contact the Taylor & Francis Open Access Books team. We are here to help with any questions or queries you may have. Get in touch

Seeing the World through Children’s Eyes book launch Dec 3

Mark December 3rd in your diary, because you’re invited to an online celebration of the launch of  Seeing the World through Children’s Eyes – Visual Methodologies and Approaches to Research in the Early Years edited by E. Jayne White,  the first volume in the exciting new book series, Visual Pedagogies, Methodologies, and Educational Research (Brill).

Seeing the World through Children’s Eyes brings an overarching emphasis on ‘seeing’ to early years research. It provides an opportunity to see and hear from leading researchers in the field concerning how they work with visual methodologies and young children. It explores the problems, pitfalls and promises that these offer for reflexive, critical inquiry that privileges the ‘work of the eye’ whilst implicating the researcher ‘I’ for what is revealed. Readers are invited to see for themselves what might be revealed through their discoveries, and to contemplate how these ideas might influence their own seeings.

During the online launch you will be able to learn about how this book series came about; about the contents from some of the sixteen contributing authors; and be able to ask questions. You may even win a free copy!   Find out more, and register, here.

Thu, 3 December 2020,   20:00 – 21:00 AEDT

PESA Agora Newsletter November 2020

 

Welcome to our 3rd PESA Agora Newsletter.  We have a lot of new articles every month, including selected EPAT editorials (Impact Factor, 2019 is 1.415 ) and ACCESS: Contemporary Issues in Education, Volume 40, our open access online journal:

Seeking and sending signals: Remodelling teaching practice during the Covid-19 crisis, Allison Littlejohn

Evaluating what Mind, Brain, and Education has taught us about teaching and learning, Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa and Ali Nouri

To submit a Column, Idea, Video or place a CFP/ Notice, to PESA
Agora contact editorial@pesaagora.com;  or to submit a paper to Access contact accesseditorial@pesaagora.com.

With the festive season approaching, we are having our first funding drive, so if you are able to, please go to our website and donate to PESA Agora, to fund its ongoing development. There are options for a one-off donation or
a monthly one.

PESA Agora is part of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia (PESA), a learned society incorporated in Australia as a not-for-
profit, registered charity, ABN (Australian Business Number) 57 432 755 082. All transactions are handled for PESA through the secure payment
gateway Stripe. Our accounts are audited annually.

We really appreciate any gift you are able to make to our ongoing success –

thank you very much!

We hope you all are able to celebrate this festive time as much as Covid-19
limitations permit in your part of the world and that you and loved ones stay
safe.

Seasons greetings to you all

 from the PESA Agora team

Proposals for Editing EPAT Special Issues

Taylor & Francis have set up a new page new page for authors intending to edit special issues for EPAT. Please bookmark this page.

Edit a theme issue. We welcome proposals for theme issues in Educational Philosophy and Theory (EPAT). Editing a Special Issue is an opportunity to influence the field by proposing a novel theme that engages deeply with current thinking and promoting an emerging area of research. Such an issue should facilitate wide-ranging discussion and encourage innovative thinking and publishing including speculative and policy-related work, review and research papers. This is an opportunity to gain useful editing experience with full support from the  EPAT Editorial team and to help build an international network with top scholars in the field.

Examples of Special Issues

EPAT publishes 14 per year and 3-4 special issues per year.

 

Education for Sustainable Development: Towards achieving the SDGs (ESD for 2030).

The ESD for 2030 framework is the global framework for 2020-2030, as approved by the 40th UNESCO General Conference and acknowledged by the 74th UN General Assembly in its Resolution 74/233.

UNESCO has just published Education for Sustainable Development: A roadmap which provides guidance for Member States and other stakeholders for the implementation of ESD for 2030. Learn more. The Roadmap is now available in English and will shortly be available in other languages as well.

 

 

 

In preparation for the upcoming UNESCO World Conference on ESD 17-19 May 2021, UNESCO is organizing regional online launch events of the ESD for 2030 Roadmap to discuss implementation at the local level.

 

 

 

Register for your local session:

  •  Asia and the Pacific: Thursday 19 November 8:00 – 9:15 UTC+1 (Paris time) – Register here
  • Latin America and the Caribbean: Friday 20 November 15:00 – 16:15 UTC+1 (Paris time) Register here
  • Arab region: Tuesday 24 November 15:00 – 16:15 UTC+1 (Paris time)  Register here
  • Africa: Thursday 26 November 12:30 – 14:00 UTC+1 (Paris time) Register here
  • Europe and North America: Tuesday 1 December  15:00 – 16:15 UTC+1 (Paris time)  Register here

Contact: Alexander Leicht, Chief, Section of Education for Sustainable Development, Division for Peace and Sustainable Development, Education Sector.

Email : a.leicht@unesco.org;   http://en.unesco.org/gap-esd-clearinghouse

 

Beijing International Review of Education (BIRE) – newsletter

 

The BIRE newsletter features Volume 2, Issue 3,  2020, a special issue of 14 papers on Digital Youth: Living, Learning and Literacy, co-edited by LIN Ke from Beijing Normal U & Boris ZIZEK, Leibniz University of Hannover University, Germany.

Facebook Page: @BIREJournal

Twitter: @BireBnu

LinkedIn: @ Beijing International Review of Education BNU

YouTube Channel: @BIRE-FOE BNU

WeChat Official Account: @BIRE Journal

Imagining educational futures: the relevance of Asian cosmopolitanism – Webinar

Date: 2020-11-28
Times: Nov 28 (Sat) 11 AM to 1230PM Singapore/Hong Kong time. Note this will be Nov 28 (Sat) 2PM in Melbourne and Nov 27 (Fri) 10PM in Illinois, USA
Overview: Scholarly interest in cosmopolitanism and its implications for education has intensified since the turn of the century in recognition of the realities of globalization. The concept of cosmopolitanism has been widely used by scholars to address the challenges of globalization, and is commonly translated as ‘citizen of the world’, as originating from Ancient Greek Cynic and Stoic philosophers.  Cosmopolitan ideals have also been located in major philosophical ideas in the East. In this webinar, we bring together prominent scholars to discuss the following:
1.          What are the contributions of Eastern philosophies to the concept of Asian cosmopolitanism and how is this concept of relevance today?
2.          What is the significance of Asian cosmopolitanism and philosophy for education today?
3.          What are the possibilities and challenges for cosmopolitan learning especially in light of the intensification of xenophobia and intolerance arising from the global pandemic?

Educational Philosophy and Theory: Editorials and articles (October 2020)

Editorials – Free Access

Michael A. Peters, David Neilson & Liz Jackson. (2020) Post-marxism, humanism and (post)structuralism: Educational philosophy and theory. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1824783

Michael A. Peters. (2020) Ascetic self-cultivation, Foucault and the hermeneutics of the self. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1826302

George Yancy. (2020) Black disciplinary zones and the exposure of whiteness. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1830062

Bakhtiar Shabani Varaki & Reza Mohammadi Chaboki. (2020) Iranian philosophy of education. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1837619

Michael A. Peters. (2020) Alas America! Lament for a shattered dream on the eve of political breakdown. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1837620

Michael A. Peters. (2020) The coming pandemic era. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1835647

The Long Read

Fazal Rizvi, Michael A. Peters, Michalinos Zembylas, Shivali Tukdeo, Mark Mason, Lynn Mario de Souza, Wang Chengbing, Crain Soudien, Bob Lingard, Paul Tarc, Aparna Tarc, Conrad Hughes, Annette Bamberger, Lew Zipin & A. G. Rud. (2020) On the global relevance of the US elections. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1824784

Articles

Antti Saari & John Mullen. (2020) Strange loops, oedipal logic, and an apophatic ecology: Reimagining critique in environmental education. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1829466

Facundo Norberto Bey. (2020) State Typohumanism and its role in the rise of völkisch-racism: Paideía and humanitas at issue in Jaeger’s and Krieck’s ‘political Plato’. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1835642

Sharon Stein, Vanessa Andreotti, Rene Suša, Cash Ahenakew & Tereza Čajková. (2020) From “education for sustainable development” to “education for the end of the world as we know it”. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1835646

Joseph Ulatowski & Ruth Walker.  (2020) Missing in action: Exposing the moral failures of universities that desert researchers facing court-ordered disclosure of confidential information. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1830061

Emnet Tadesse Woldegiorgis. (2020) Decolonising a higher education system which has never been colonised’. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1835643

Neil Harrison. (2020) Learning in the presence of others: Using the body as a resource for teaching. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1835645

Michael A. Peters, E. Jayne White, Marek Tesar, Andrew Gibbons, Sonja Arndt, Niina Rutanen, Sheila Degotardi, Andi Salamon, Kim Browne, Bridgette Redder, Jennifer Charteris, Kiri Gould, Alison Warren, Andrea Delaune, Olivera Kamenarac, Nina Hood & Sean Sturm. (2020) Infantologies. An EPAT collective writing project. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1835648

Jason James Wallin. (2020) The Holocene Simulacrum. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1835644

Jian Li & Eryong Xue. (2020) “Teach to adapt or adapt to teach”: qualitative study on the new “special-post teachers” in China’s rural schools. Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1840350

EPAT Impact Factor increase for 2019

 

We are pleased to announce the Impact Factor for Educational Philosophy and Theory (EPAT) 2019 is 1.415. In the Journal Citation Reports, Category: Education & Educational Research, it is 162 out of 263 journals in Quartile 3. This is an increase on the 2018 impact Factor.

Congratulations and thank you to everyone involved – editors, reviewers, authors, Taylor & Francis and of course the readers who have cited our published articles!

Open Access Week 2020

The theme for 2020 International Open Access Week, to be held October 19-25, is  “Open with Purpose: Taking Action to Build Structural Equity and Inclusion.”…

PESA supports open access in several ways: our journal, ACCESS: Contemporary Issues in Education is Open Access, as is PESA Agora, and all Educational Philosophy and Theory Editorials as well as some articles.

CFP: Special Issue of Policy Futures in Education (PFIE): Educational Futures

Dates: 2020-10-20 - 2020-11-15

This special issue of Policy Futures in Education asks authors to imagine educational futures. What do education, school, teaching, learning, curriculum, and pedagogy look like 10, 20, 50, or 100 years from now? One way to think about these issues is futures studies. Based on work developed in the second half of the 20th Century (Bell, 1997; Dator, 2002), futures studies asks a series of questions, the most significant being: what is probable (what is most likely to happen); what is possible (what could happen); and what is preferable (what do you want to have happen)? Additionally, the best illustrations we have of futures thinking lie in science fiction, which often operates from a position of prefactual thinking – that is, anticipating what might happen should some future event occur. This is different from counterfactual thinking, in which the present is reimagined based on a past event (Sanna, 1996). Authors should adopt a prefactual perspective, and are encouraged to draw on examples from science fiction to imagine scenarios of the future of education.

Bell, W. (1997). Foundations of futures studies: Human science for a new era. Volume I:   History, purposes, and knowledge. Transaction Publishers. Dator, J. A. (Ed.), Futures studies in higher education. Praeger.              Sanna, L. J. (1996). Defensive pessimism, optimism, and simulating alternatives: Some ups and   downs of prefactual and counterfactual thinking. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71(5), 1020-1036.

Please see the full CFP before submitting an abstract. Proposals with a tentative title, 250-word abstract, and author(s) should be sent to Special Issue Editor, Dr. David W. Kupfermanassistant professor of educational foundations at Minnesota State University Moorhead by November 15, 2020Full papers are to be submitted by February 15, 2021.

 

 

The Education Hub

The Education Hub is a New Zealand based not for profit with a mission to bridge the gap between research and practice in education by providing teachers with access to trustworthy, practical and easy-to-read research on topics that matter to them. It has a large online library of free-to-access multimedia resources covering a wide range of topics relevant to Early Childhood Education and the primary and secondary school sectors.
The Founder is Dr Nina Hood, who is also Editor for Access: Contemporary Issues in Education.
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Educational Philosophy and Theory: Editorials and articles (September 2020)

Editorials – Free Access

Michael A. Peters. (2020) Educational philosophies of self-cultivation: Chinese humanism   Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1811679

Lynda Stone. (2020)  Does this editorial have an ending? Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1787093

Michael A. Peters. (2020)   Language-games philosophy: Language-games as rationality and method Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1821190

Bill Cope & Mary Kalantzis. (2020)  Futures for research in education Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1824781

Y. Manoj , Joff P. N. Bradley & Alex Taek-Gwang Lee. (2020) Gadfly or praying mantis? Three philosophical perspectives on the Delhi student protests Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1823211

Mitja Sardoč. (2020)  The rebranding of neoliberalism Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1823212

Sonja Arndt , Rachel Buchanan , Andrew Gibbons , Ruyu Hung , Andrew Madjar , Rene Novak , Janet Orchard , Michael A. Peters , Sean Sturm , Marek Tesar & Nina Hood (Open Reviewer). (2020) Collective writing: Introspective reflections on current experience Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1824782

The Long Read

Petar Jandrić , Jimmy Jaldemark , Zoe Hurley , Brendan Bartram , Adam Matthews , Michael Jopling , Julia Mañero , Alison MacKenzie , Jones Irwin , Ninette Rothmüller, Benjamin Green , Shane J. Ralston , Olli Pyyhtinen , Sarah Hayes , Jake Wright , Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar. (2020)  Philosophy of education in a new key: Who remembers Greta Thunberg? Education and environment after the coronavirus Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1811678

Liz Jackson, Kal Alston, Lauren Bialystok, Larry Blum , Nicholas C. Burbules , Ann Chinnery, David T. Hansen, Kathy Hytten, Cris Mayo, Trevor Norris , Sarah M. Stitzlein , Winston C. Thompson, Leonard Waks, Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar. (2020) Philosophy of education in a New Key: Snapshot 2020 from the United States and Canada Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1821189

Articles

Charlene Tan. (2020)  Confucius and Langerian mindfulness Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1814740

Elin Sundström Sjödin & Ninni Wahlström. (2020)  Reading in the wing chair: the shaping of teaching and reading bodies in the transactional performativity of materialities Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1814739

Asilia Franklin-Phipps & Laura Smithers. (2020)  Queer Black adolescence, the impasse, and the pedagogy of cinema Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1811677

Anniina Leiviskä. (2020)  A discourse theoretical model for determining the limits of free speech on campus Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1814256

Mitja Sardoč & Tomaž Deželan Talents and distributive justice: some tensions Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1808021

Xiaowei Yang , Hua Ran & Meng Zhang. (2020)  The Shanghai model: An innovative approach to promote teacher professional development through teaching-research system Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1794155

Eryong Xue , Jian Li & Liujie Xu. (2020)  Online education action for defeating COVID-19 in China: An analysis of the system, mechanism and mode Educational Philosophy and Theory, DOI:10.1080/00131857.2020.1821188

Routledge – 2 new books: Pandemic Education and Viral Politics; The Far-Right, Education and Violence

Pandemic Education and Viral Politics (ISBN: 9780367635404) – avail 8 October – flyer:  Pandemic Education and Viral Politics – flyer

and

The Far-Right, Education and ViolenceAn Educational Philosophy and Theory Reader Volume IX (ISBN: 9780367562014)  avail Nov 2020

Both books are by Michael A. Peters & Tina Besley, featuring papers published in Educational Philosophy and Theory (EPAT)

Invitation to Contribute to Springer Encyclopedias: Educational Philosophy and Theory, Teacher Education, Educational Innovation

Invitation to become a Section Editor for one of three new Springer Encyclopedia projects:

Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theoryest 2018

Encyclopedia of Teacher Educationest 2019-20

Encyclopedia of Educational Innovationest 2019-20

These encyclopedias are all Living Reference Works for educational research and practice that are continuously updated on a dedicated web site, and have hard copy books also appearing in companion volumes.

 

The Encyclopedia of Educational Philosophy and Theory is a dynamic reference and study place for students, teachers, researchers and professionals in the field of education, philosophy and social sciences, offering both short and long entries on topics of theoretical and practical interest in educational theory and philosophy by authoritative world scholars representing the full ambit of education as a rapidly expanding global field of knowledge and expertise. This is an encyclopaedia that is truly global and while focused mainly on the Western tradition is also respectful and representative of other knowledge traditions. It professes to understand the globalization of knowledge. It is unique in the sense that it is based on theoretical orientations and approaches to the main concepts and theories in education, drawing on the range of disciplines in the social sciences. The encyclopaedia privileges the “theory of practice”, recognizing that education as a discipline and activity is mainly a set of professional practices that inherently involves questions of power and expertise for the transmission, socialization and critical debate of competing norms and values.

The Encyclopedia of Teacher Education is a dynamic and living reference that student teachers, teacher educators, researchers and professionals in the field of education with an accent on all aspects of teacher education, including: teaching practice; ITE; teacher induction; teacher development; professional learning; teacher education policies; quality assurance; professional knowledge, standards and organisations; teacher ethics; and research on teacher education, among other issues. The Encyclopedia is an authoritative work by a collective of leading world scholars representing different cultures and traditions, the global policy convergence and counter-practices relating to the teacher education profession. The accent will be equally on teaching practice and practitioner knowledge, skills and understanding as well as current research, models and approaches to teacher education.

The Encyclopedia of Educational Innovation The field of innovation studies is very recent. This encyclopedia offers an up to date account of the way that educational practise at all levels are being deeply impacted and changed by innovation. It provides entries covering details and insights into the economics, sociology, management and psychology of education and also how education is affected by philosophy, history, web science and Internet Studies. It embraces new fields like collective intelligence, social media and network analysis, artificial intelligence, automation and deep learning. It has become one of the most dominant discourses of the knowledge economy also referred to as the ‘innovative economy.’ On this economic model, innovation is a source of ongoing productivity and growth. It is a model that favours education at all levels as the policy mothership that increasingly guides a new cultural and sharing economics in its social and open dimensions as a means of developing platforms for openness, creativity and innovation. This new model of open and social innovation is a very different notion to the standard economic view, bringing to the fore the ethics of collaboration in the service of co-creation, peer- and co-production that is more suited to the digital age of social media. It is a model that has the power to radically transform education in the near future as educational institutions become less like factories in the industrial age and more like a Google workplace in the knowledge age.

 

This is an opportunity for you to become involved in one of these projects, supported by a professional team at Springer in a global, dynamic and continuously updatable project where educationalists can develop, share and support the latest relevant materials. Your expertise is valued and we hope you will become involved as part of a professional team working together on these projects.

Become a Section Editor responsible for editing ten contributing authors, with each contributor writing an entry of 3,000 words including 3-5 references.

Please indicate a preferred topic and feel free to discuss themes or topics you think may be appropriate for this project, by contacting:

Michael A. Peters, Distinguished Professor, Beijing Normal University, PR China.

mpeters@bnu.edu.cn

 

Kia Kaha Te Reo Māori – ‘Let’s make the Māori language strong’

Kia ora  – Hello everyone

In Aotearoa/ New Zealand, this week we have been celebrating Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori  – Māori Language Week  The link here tells you what it is and why it is so important to honour and revitalise our official language of New Zealand – a taonga or treasure.

Here is the Maori Language Moment & Movement you can join to:

Honour our past, celebrate the present, and join together for our future.
Kia kaha te reo Māori!
Kia kaha Aotearoa!

Check out Massey University’s free online courses in Te Reo Māori and Tikanga Māori: Toro Mai 

CFP: Special Issue of Educational Philosophy and Theory (EPAT): Paulo Freire Centennial: Reinventing Freire for 2021

Dates: 2020-08-27 - 2020-09-15

As we celebrate 100 years since Paulo Freire’s birth in September 2021 and fifty years since the initial publication of Pedagogy of the Oppressed, this special issue of Educational Philosophy and Theory (EPAT) will focus on how Freire’s work continues to reinvent education worldwide and how scholars continue to reinvent his work. We specifically use reinvention because Freire vehemently argued for the “social theoretical recontextualization [of his work] and a rejection of unreflexive, mechanical efforts to ‘import’ his pedagogy into different social and cultural contexts” (Morrow & Torres, 2019, pp. 247-248). Countering fatalistic teaching that reproduces and justifies oppressions, and working towards better futures, Freirean education centers students’ “dream of constant reinvention of the world, the dream of liberation, thus the dream of a less ugly society, one less mean-only dream of human beings’ silent adaptation to a reality considered untouchable” (Freire, 2004, p. 85)[i].  In the spirit of reinvention towards social justice and planetary sustainability, we are broadly seeking submissions that depart from current Freirean debates on a diverse range of themes.

Please see the full CFP at http://bit.ly/_Educational_Philosophy_Theory before submitting an abstract. Proposals with a tentative title, 300-word abstract, and author(s) listed should be sent to editor Dr. Greg William Misiaszek (gmisiaszek@gmail.com) and Dr. Tsegay  (samex221@gmail.com) by September 15, 2020.

Full papers are to be submitted by January 31, 2021.

[i] Freire, P. (2004). Pedagogy of indignation. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers.

Morrow, R. A., & Torres, C. A. (2019). Rereading Freire and Habermas: Philosophical anthropology and reframing critical pedagogy and educational research in the neoliberal anthropocene. In C. Torres, A. (Ed.), Wiley Handbook of Paulo Freire (pp. 241-274). New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell.

Special Issue Editors

 

Greg Misiaszek is an Assistant Professor of educational theories at Beijing Normal University (BNU) and Associate Director of the Paulo Freire Institute, UCLA

 

 

Lauren Ila Misiaszek is an Associate Professor of international and comparative education at Beijing Normal University (BNU) and Associate Director of the Paulo Freire Institute, UCLA

 

 

Samson Maekele Tsegay is a Roehampton University Sacred Heart (RUSH) fellow and visiting lecturer at Roehampton University, School of Education